Frederick Iat-Hin Tam


Project Research Assistant


Curriculum vitae


[email protected]

Meteorology Building - C205
National Taiwan University
No.1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei, 10617, Taiwan



Frederick Iat-Hin Tam


Project Research Assistant


Contact

Frederick Iat-Hin Tam


Project Research Assistant


Curriculum vitae


[email protected]

Meteorology Building - C205
National Taiwan University
No.1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei, 10617, Taiwan




Frederick Iat-Hin Tam


Welcome!

I am a project research assistant in meteorology affiliated with the  National Taiwan University.  I am broadly interested in storm physics, precipitation processes, emphasizing on the multiscale interaction between storms and environment leading to extreme precipitation. In all of my research projects, I tried to combine a love of field work and numerical modeling to illustrate hidden relationships in the data. The main observational tool I used is polarimetric radars, which can be used to infer kinematic and microphysical processes in precipitating storms. Physical inferences gleaned from observations can be further tested with physical process limiting modeling. A recent collaboration with Ming-Jen Yang (NTU) and Wen-Chau Lee (NCAR) on the development of a new radar observable to reveal information on difficult-to-observe storm thermodynamics, exemplify my research approach well. Lately, I have been increasingly interested in leveraging statistical methods and big data on the interaction between weather and climate.

Publications


Polarimetric size sorting signatures in the convective regions of PECAN MCSs: their implications on convective kinematics, thermodynamics, and precipitation pathways


Frederick Iat-Hin Tam, Ming-Jen Yang, Wen-Chau Lee


In revision, Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 2021


Sensitivity of Simulated Nocturnal Convective Systems to Graupel Sedimentation Characteristics


Frederick Iat-Hin Tam, Ming-Jen Yang


Preprints. 2019 Conference of Weather Analysis and Forecast, Taiwan Geoscience Assembly (TGA), 2019 May


View all

Projects




Identifying Critical Mechanisms Sustaining Nocturnal Storms: Role of Microphysics and Environmental Moisture (2016-2019; 2021-)


Precipitation from nocturnal MCSs is critical to the agricultural industry in the U. S. Great Plains. In this project, a combination of observation, reanalysis, and modeling was used to understand why some storms sustain longer than others.




Diagnose hard-to-observe storm characteristics with radar observables (2020-2021)


Storm kinematic/thermodynamic characteristics are important but often hard to observe. In this project, we analyzed 74.5 hours of radar data to explore the feasibility of using a novel radar observable to diagnose the hard-to-observes.




Evaluating model depiction of boundary layer diurnal cycles over a subtropical island (2021-)


A validating study to test what WRF configurations best emulate observed BL evolution. My task in this project is to develop a simple algorithm that identifies BL height from lidar data.




Convective Organization and Precipitation Processes in Near-Saturated Subtropical Environments (2021-)


In early June 2021, we acquired high temporal resolution radiosonde measurements (even under soft lock-down!) on the pre- and post-storm environment on two shear-paralleled MCSs in near-saturated environment.

Pages


Teaching


Here are some courses that I served as the teaching assistant during and after my MS career